Press/Studies Moralized Rationality: Logic as a Moral Issue

jan

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electrolyte

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As in Studies 1 and 2, we filtered out participants who took part more than once (n = 18) as well as extremely fast responders (n = 22
I wonder if they used IPs or Worker IDs to identify people who they believe took the survey more than once. If they used IPs, they likely were filtering out roommates, partners, etc. and not actually retakes.
 
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DCI

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Interesting find, but not exactly ground breaking results. Of course logical thinkers believe that the use of reason is virtuous, because using reason is the most reliable way of achieving whatever outcomes agree most with our morality, whatever those may be.

I also think it's pretty much a given that their future research will show that moralizing rationality scales with capacity. No reasonable person thinks that a 5-year-old in a moving car has done something wrong because he thinks that the moon is chasing him. No one cares, because 5-year-olds are idiots. Otoh, if an accomplished academic and scientist advocated throwing every fifth child into a volcano for good luck, it's safe to say that most people would not have a high opinion of that person or be interested in having a comprehensive debate on the merits of volcano sacrifice.

Anyways, not trying to hate on the research. It's pretty interesting and obviously very well done. I guess most research probably doesn't produce surprising results.

I was actually listening to a podcast today that featured an interview with Paul Bloom, who is a Yale professor and kind of a big deal, and about 2/3 of the way through he casually mentioned using mturk for some of his recent research, with no explanation at all from him or the host of what mturk is, implying that it's somewhat of a household name at this point among academics.

The podcast: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIK2vlE6UIk
 
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