Making Money as a Requester

lobo925

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I'm not sure if this is the right spot, but I thought it might be..

The thought has been running through my head for a few days now

If you were a requester, what ways would or could you make money?

You have a huge workforce, you can pay most of them pennies, if not a little more

There has to be profit in there somewhere
 
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Lepi

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I think the basic formula is to find a job that needs doing, pay workers pennies to do it, then turn around and sell the resulting work for 5-10 times the amount you paid.

Best example of that is content milling. Pay a worker a dollar to write a Top 10 list. Turn around, sell the Top 10 List for 20 bucks to one of those click bait sites. Profit!
 

lobo925

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You always want at the least %100 profit, but at the rate which mturk can supply it I agree 50% won't be bad..

Hmmm.. I need to find the niche that is not currently exploited.. I just can't find it
 
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Lepi

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It's kind of a hard thing to directly monotize. Most of the people who ultimately make money from the work done by Mturk workers are people like app developers. Like the business card guy... he runs a website/app where people pay him to digitalize all of their business contacts. They pay him a fairly substantial fee, take pictures of all the business cards people give him. He then posts the business cards on Mturk. People transcribe the cards, he sells the work back to the client.

There are a lot of problems with making the whole thing profitable.

1: Figuring out how to turn the work you need done in to microlabor. You have to break everything down in to bite size chunks, and you have to make sure the task is easy for workers to understand.
2 : Quality. Insuring workers provide good quality work is a huge pain. If you reject people for bad quality, they bitch and moan and hamper work flow. If you don't reject bad quality, you're left paying for shit work that you can't turn around and sell. Qualifications help, but you have to spend the time to monitor the qualifications and set up a decent work force that's both skilled enough to do the work correctly and big enough to do the work well.
3 : Turn around time. You have to get results fast.
4: Finding the appropriate wage. Too low, no one does the work. Too high, you don't make any money.

Honestly, I don't think it's the kind of thing you can do quickly, and the amount of time and effort might not even be worth it.
 

lobo925

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I can understand that,, especially with the reference mentioned..

But man...I still feel like there is something I can do on here worth money
I dont know, a Real Life Live and Learn
 
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