server ping time

orchardstreet

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does anyone know what the smallest ping time is you can set generally in milliseconds? what about for just hit finder? And for how long?

Like can I set hit finder at 1000ms and run all day and amazon won't care? Default on scripts is usually 1500ms. I know that you need to dial it back if you get PREs and page request limits but I was wondering how far you can technically push it without getting in trouble. Both in how long during the day and the ping frequency.

thx :)
 

TSolo315

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Amazon is surprisingly lax about this. They will let you push it until you start getting PREs. This happens at around two requests in a second, so you can get away with 500 ms (maybe even a little faster) if you are only running a single script/no pandas/etc.

In practice when using multiple scripts that make requests simultaneously you have to go slower as the requests are not synchronized and will overlap resulting in PREs.

No one knows what criteria Amazon uses when suspending accounts/sending warnings though. And it's subject to change at any moment.
 

aveline

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does anyone know what the smallest ping time is you can set generally in milliseconds? what about for just hit finder? And for how long?

Like can I set hit finder at 1000ms and run all day and amazon won't care? Default on scripts is usually 1500ms. I know that you need to dial it back if you get PREs and page request limits but I was wondering how far you can technically push it without getting in trouble. Both in how long during the day and the ping frequency.

thx :)
Just to add on to the post above, I don't think it's really anything that you need to worry about, unless you're up to no good. PREs are just a result of Amazon attempting to balance the load on their servers. If you're getting too many, then you can dial it back a bit. But if you're intentionally trying to generate as many page requests as you can, like with the intent to break stuff, then Amazon is going to have a problem with it. But I don't think it's possible to generate that many page requests accidentally. You have to know exactly what you're doing.